Tuesday, January 6, 2009

A. A. Milne and Winnie The Pooh

Alan Alexander Milne (1882-1956) was an English playwright and author of Winnie The Pooh who was born in London. A. A. Milne attended Cambridge University and subsequently worked as the assistant editor of weekly publication Punch. Following his service from 1915 to 1918 in the English military during World War One, he wrote a number of comedies including more than 25 plays. Notable among these early comedies are Wursel Flummery (1917), Belinda (1918), Mr Pin Passes By (1919), The Camberley Triangle (1919), The Romantic Age (1920), Mr Pim (1921), The Great Broxopp (1923), Ariadne (1925), Portrait of a Gentleman in Slippers (1926), and Michael and Mary (1930). A. A. Milne also wrote a number of fictional novels including The Day's Play (1910), Once on a Time (1917), Two People (1931), Four Days' Wonder (1933), and Chloe Marr (1946). The only mystery - detective novel A. A. Milne wrote was The Red House Mystery (1922), which is considered as one of the first mystery novels to use comedy as a key element. The most famous books by A. A. Milne are his children's stories, which today are considered as both classics of English Literature and Children's Literature. The Children's story books by A. A. Milne include When We Were Very Young (1924), Gallery of Children (1925), Winnie-the-Pooh (1926), Now We Are Six (1927), The House at Pooh Corner (1928), and a number of short stories for children. His inspiration for Winnie The Pooh and other Children's books was his son Christopher Robin, who is also featured in a number of books by A. A. Milne. In the first publications he used the illustrator E. H. Shepard for Winnie The Pooh and his other classic Pooh stories. His autobiography It's Too Late Now was published in 1939.

The Easton Press published the Winnie the Pooh classics as a 4 book set including Winnie The Pooh, When We Were Very Young, Now We Are Six, and The House at Pooh Corner. The only A. A. Milne book published by the Franklin Library was The Red House Mystery.



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